mollusksurfshop:

John Severson and Renny Yater share an oily moment. The Ranch, 1961

mollusksurfshop:

John Severson and Renny Yater share an oily moment. The Ranch, 1961

Amazed to be mentioned in Surfline’s “What Is A Watermerman?” article!
Read the story here. 

Amazed to be mentioned in Surfline’s “What Is A Watermerman?” article!

Read the story here

The Granger family ready to take on Baja!

The Granger family ready to take on Baja!

Saturday night at the Pedro Point Firehouse in Pacifica. Appearance by The Band of Frequencies from Australia. Tickets in advance or at the door, doors open at 6 and the music starts shortly thereafter. The film shows at 7:30 and there will be a Q&A with the director and cast members after.

Saturday night at the Pedro Point Firehouse in Pacifica. Appearance by The Band of Frequencies from Australia. Tickets in advance or at the door, doors open at 6 and the music starts shortly thereafter. The film shows at 7:30 and there will be a Q&A with the director and cast members after.

This cart was made by my step dad Oren out of bicycle front ends in 1964. I would pull it behind my bicycle in Montecito from home to Miramar and Hammonds with my little brother Pete on the back with our 2 Owls. I would swerve back and forth all the way to the beach trying to buck him off. That is Mark Mosby with “Lukie” the family dog. The Mosbys inherited the trailer when we moved. They were among the hottest of SB surfers in the day. Photo: Mark Mosby

This cart was made by my step dad Oren out of bicycle front ends in 1964. I would pull it behind my bicycle in Montecito from home to Miramar and Hammonds with my little brother Pete on the back with our 2 Owls. I would swerve back and forth all the way to the beach trying to buck him off. That is Mark Mosby with “Lukie” the family dog. The Mosbys inherited the trailer when we moved. They were among the hottest of SB surfers in the day. Photo: Mark Mosby

Note the Owl leaning on the house with a Flo-Thru fin. Dated June 1965 I did all of drawing during school classes. Besides surfboard work I loved to draw cartoons. This one is my rendition of Edwards Ranch Point north of Goleta.

Note the Owl leaning on the house with a Flo-Thru fin. Dated June 1965 I did all of drawing during school classes. Besides surfboard work I loved to draw cartoons. This one is my rendition of Edwards Ranch Point north of Goleta.

Marcelo Jorge lives in São Paulo Brazil. He owns and trains race horses and partners with my dad on some horses as well. He loves surfing and we sent him a Vaquero and here he is surfing his new board at home. 

Marcelo Jorge lives in São Paulo Brazil. He owns and trains race horses and partners with my dad on some horses as well. He loves surfing and we sent him a Vaquero and here he is surfing his new board at home. 

This is a solid Olo recreation made from a rare solid slab of Koa from the big Island of Hawaii. It is 11’ by 19” by 3”. These boards were generally used by royalty and ridden in soft rolling waves at Waikiki. Steeper waves were better for the Alaia which was shorter and thinner. The most prized Olo’s were made from Wiliwili wood which is Hawaiian balsa. They were lighter and easier to ride. None I them survived unfortunately. The ones made of Koa, an indigenous hard wood, were heavy and beautiful and Kin Paki’s board survives in the Bishop Museum in Honolulu. This board is modeled after it and weighs 90 pounds. It is finished with a hand rubbed oil and varnish mixture. It now lives in Florida with a patron of surf history! 

This is a solid Olo recreation made from a rare solid slab of Koa from the big Island of Hawaii. It is 11’ by 19” by 3”. These boards were generally used by royalty and ridden in soft rolling waves at Waikiki. Steeper waves were better for the Alaia which was shorter and thinner. The most prized Olo’s were made from Wiliwili wood which is Hawaiian balsa. They were lighter and easier to ride. None I them survived unfortunately. The ones made of Koa, an indigenous hard wood, were heavy and beautiful and Kin Paki’s board survives in the Bishop Museum in Honolulu. This board is modeled after it and weighs 90 pounds. It is finished with a hand rubbed oil and varnish mixture. It now lives in Florida with a patron of surf history! 

CJ Nelson on a 9’6 Vaquero in Mexico! 

CJ: I was lucky enough to score this beautiful Andreini Vaquero a few months back. This board was made for Kirk Putnam to emulate boards that were ridden in a certain segment of ”Innermost limits of pure fun”. Its a blast to ride such a long hull. It taught me a lot about trim and positioning. Thank you Marc for telling me the history and theory behind this particular board. Great design.

Me and Gene Cooper holding one of Greenoughs tri plane hull knee boards from the 70’s at last years trade show in Del Mar. It also has a flex tail. This board has a fin box and the original fin was tuna style template with a real slender out line, with a true thick foil at the base and made of solid aluminum. Absolutely no flex, the torsion came from the board. I had shivers and chills just from the sight of it. Most people are not aware of this Greenough design. He made them for all around surf since crowds had become wide spread in the 70’s and he did not have enough space in the water to ride his red flex hull; Velo. 

Me and Gene Cooper holding one of Greenoughs tri plane hull knee boards from the 70’s at last years trade show in Del Mar. It also has a flex tail. This board has a fin box and the original fin was tuna style template with a real slender out line, with a true thick foil at the base and made of solid aluminum. Absolutely no flex, the torsion came from the board. I had shivers and chills just from the sight of it. Most people are not aware of this Greenough design. He made them for all around surf since crowds had become wide spread in the 70’s and he did not have enough space in the water to ride his red flex hull; Velo. 

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